Best Violin Strings

Violin July 30, 2019
violin strings
Damilola

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Best Violin Strings

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violin strings

There can be no violin without strings as strings form the most important part of every violin. Violins typically use four strings played either by drawing a bow across the strings or using fingers to pluck them. When learning to play the violin, the strings you use could play a very vital role in determining the kind of sound you are able to create.

Moreover, strings vary from each other in sound, playability, responsiveness, and volume or projection. Since you are playing this violin mainly to have fun, you need strings that are pleasing to your ears and those of your audience.

Best Rated Violin Strings Reviewed

D’Addario Prelude Violin String Set

  • Workmanship is excellent
  • Very user-friendly
  • Produces a warm sound
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Thomastik Dominant 4/4 Violin String Set

  • Sounds neutral and sweet
  • Strong and stable
  • They are easy to tune
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Pirastro Evah Pirazzi 4/4 Violin String Set

  • Good quality strings
  • They are very responsive
  • Strings are well balanced
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Vizcaya 2 Full Sets Violin String

  • They play well
  • Strings are color-coated
  • Package comes with extra 12 strings
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D’Addario Helicore 4/4 Size Violin Strings with Steel E String

  • Versatile
  • Great sound projection
  • Produce a darker tone
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No matter how great your violin’s strings are, you will need to replace it over the course of your career. The strings you attach to your violin have a very important role to play in the quality of music you produce. So, using the wrong set of strings with wrong tension will result in bad music. There are so many high-quality strings available that do not cost too much and will last for some time. Therefore, here are some of the best violin strings we can suggest to you.

D’Addario Prelude Violin String Set, 4/4 Scale, Medium Tension

D’Addario Prelude Violin String Set, 4/4 Scale, Medium Tension

Pros:

  • Workmanship is excellent
  • Very user-friendly
  • Produces a warm sound
  • Lightweight

Cons:

  • The volume can get low
  • Sometimes can snaps easily

This violin string set has a solid steel core that is meant to last. These USA-made strings will fit any violin with a size of 4/4 and length of 13″. They provide medium tension and produce a sound that is warm and clear. Moreover, these strings are sealed in quality pouches to prevent them from corroding.

Furthermore, most violinists love to upgrade to these strings because the tone they produce is beautiful, warm, and very rich. Also, the smooth and durable nature of these strings make them a great choice for beginners to start out on.

Thomastik Dominant 4/4 Violin String Set - Medium Gauge - Steel Ball-End E

Thomastik Dominant 4/4 Violin String Set - Medium Gauge - Steel Ball-End E

Pros:

  • Sounds neutral and sweet
  • Strong and stable
  • They are easy to tune
  • Excellent quality set of strings
  • The tonal quality is nice

Cons:

  • Quite sensitive to setup
  • Quite pricey

This violin string set is synthetic, flexible and has a multi-strand nylon core. The set of strings has a medium gauge and will fit perfectly into a size 4/4 violin. In this set, there are All Ball-End Aluminium/Perlon A, Aluminum/Perlon D, Silver/Perlon G, and Ball-End Steel E.

Furthermore, this set of strings is popular, highly suggested and is great for its sweet and clear sound after it has been broken in.

Pirastro Evah Pirazzi 4/4 Violin String Set - Medium Gauge - with Ball-End Gold-Plated E

Pirastro Evah Pirazzi 4/4 Violin String Set - Medium Gauge - With Ball-End Gold-Plated E

Pros:

  • Good quality strings
  • They are very responsive
  • Strings are well balanced
  • Produce a warm and clear sound
  • Tone is bright and warm

Cons:

  • Strings grow tired after a couple of months
  • Quite expensive

This violin string set produces a synthetic core that sounds very brilliant. It offers quick response and range that is wide and dynamic. The strings will fit perfectly on a 4/4 sized violin and is medium gauged.

Furthermore, these fabulous strings come in a package that includes a ball-end gold-plated steel E string, and ball-end aluminum wound synthetic Core A, Core D and Core G strings.

Vizcaya 2 Full Sets Violin String (G-D-A-E, G-D-A-E) for 4/4 - 3/4 Size Beginner, Student Violin Replacement, Extra 4 String (E1, A2, E1, A2)

Vizcaya 2 Full Sets Violin String

Pros:

  • They play well
  • Strings are color-coated
  • Package comes with extra 12 strings
  • Sturdy

Cons:

  • Some customers are not happy with the sound

This violin string set has a durable steel core composite aluminum-magnesium alloy that has a ball end. These beginner replacement strings are specifically for violins sized 4/4 and 3/4. The strings are flexible and soft-textured, which makes them very easy to play with.

Furthermore, it produces a very even and bright tone with a clear sound that violinists love. This beautiful string set is also color-coated. When you buy this package, you get 12 reliable extra strings, which are 4-E, 4-A, 2-D and 2-G strings.

D’Addario Helicore 4/4 Size Violin Strings with Steel E String

D’Addario Helicore 4/4 Size Violin Strings With Steel E String

Pros:

  • Versatile
  • Great sound projection
  • Produce a darker tone
  • The strings are soft to the touch
  • Strings are flexible and responsive

Cons:

  • Some strings vibrate too much
  • Strings may be too narrow for some fingers

This violin string set has Zyex composite synthetic core strings that have very high projection. These high-quality strings are particularly for violins with a 4/4 scale and 13 inches playing length. The tension they provide is medium and they are very easy to play.

Furthermore, these USA-manufactured strings are also very responsive and versatile. The tone produced by tuning and settling is usually clear and rich. No matter the climatic condition, these strings remain stable and ensure unparalleled performance.

Key Considerations When Buying Violin Strings

We cannot overemphasize the role of good quality strings on a violin. However, no violin perfectly suits every kind of violin or every player. Buying the best violin strings can be quite difficult if you are not sure of what the perfect string for you should sound like. That’s where your teacher comes in. One of the duties of a violin teacher is to recommend strings that will perfectly suit you. In light of this, there are some basic factors you should consider before choosing the best violin strings. These considerations are seen below.

  • Know the Types of Strings – There are different types of strings from different materials. Knowing the types will help narrow your search. The three main types of strings are below.
    • Gut Core – These are the original strings with designs that people use for centuries. They are usually from the intestines of sheep, have lower tension, complex tone, and lots of overtones. They are often more flexible when plucked by the fingers and respond more slowly. Moreover, these strings often require tuning more frequently and more so when there is a sudden temperature change in the room. Thus, to produce better sound, you should use a bow when playing gut strings.
  • Steel Core – These strings, also called steel E strings, are the least expensive strings. The tone of these strings is usually brilliant and very clear. They also produce a quick response. Moreover, the strings are of three types, which are plain, plated, and wrapped steel.
  • Synthetic Core – These gut-like strings are of synthetic materials and have more stable pitch than guts. The focus of these strings is on producing a tone that has less complex overtones. Their tonal characteristics classy and fascinating.
  • String Gauge – This is simply known as the width of the string. A string may have three different gauges namely: medium, thinner and thicker string gauges. The medium string gauge has low tension, good volume, with a bright and responsive tone. Comparatively, a thinner string gauge or dolce has lower volume, lower tension, but a tone that is brighter and more responsive than that of the medium string gauge. The thicker or forte string gauge, however, gives a slower response and a darker tone.
  • String Tension – Most strings are available in different tensions. Strings with low tension, like gut strings, are flexible and easier to press down while playing. Thicker strings usually need more tension to get them to pitch, while thinner strings have less tension.
  • String Winding – The alteration of the winding material enables string manufacturers to change the response and tension of the string. This is done using heavier materials like tungsten. The end result is a string with high tension that is thinner than a string made from less-dense metals like aluminum or silver. String winding is usually used on steel-core strings.
  • Musical Preferences – The kind of string you choose should depend on your preferred type of play and style. Different music genres require particular string types to sound better. Your preferred music may require the brilliant tones of steel strings or the synthetic core strings required by the classical music.
  • Playing Ability – Closely examine your playing ability before you choose a violin string set. It is important to choose the combination of strings that will improve your skills and not make it harder to apply some playing techniques. Your violin teacher can help you make the right choice based on your playing ability. You need to take out time to study the different types of string combinations for your violin.
  • Player’s Chemistry – You should also consider this factor should also be taken into consideration. Aluminum-wound strings are not very suitable for violinists with acidic perspiration. This is because the wrappings on these strings will quickly develop a rough gray surface as opposed to the wrappings of other string types. Such players will be more suited to strings like silver wrapped D.
  • Keep Experimenting – No set of strings actually last forever. You can always get new strings if the ones you have do not work well for you. Some violinists have discovered better string types that have improved their play through trial and error. To know what strings to get, take time to note the difficulties or successes you experience when your strings have been broken in. This will help you know what you need to get to improve your play when you are replaying the strings.

Final Thoughts

In conclusion, buying the best strings for your guitar may not be the easiest task for a beginner to carry out successfully. Most times, they require the recommendation of their teachers or reviews like this to help them make the right choice. As time goes on, you will adapt to your violin and the kind of sound you prefer. This will consequently make your next purchase easier.

Our recommended violin string sets will provide you with different quality options to choose from as a violinist. These recommendations will help you make a knowledgeable decision because you cannot go to the market to try out every available string there. You can rest assured that you will find one or more of the best strings from our recommendations.

Damilola

Damilolai has been writing about music for the past 7 years before joining musicgroupies.com team. When he's not working he loves going to the park with his two Jack Russell Terrier's Joe and Bells.
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